Statements of Service ​Performance

Transport
Waka

Effective cities have effective transport

Successful cities have two things in common – it’s easy for people to get together (that’s how innovation happens), and they have strong connections where it is easy to move people and goods around.

On that score, Wellington already has a well-performing transport network. The inner city is pedestrian-friendly and by national standards residents are high users of public transport.

But as the city grows and behaviour changes, more demand will be placed on our transport network. We will need to move people and goods to and through the city more quickly.

Successful cities are also eco-cities where pollution and carbon emissions are low.

We work with others to deliver

Much of our transport work is done in partnership. We are working with the New Zealand Transport Agency on improvement to key arterial routes and planning with the Greater Wellington Regional Council and others to find the right solutions for our city and the region in the future.

Increasing the resilience of our transport network is an ongoing challenge, with earthquakes and slips being the major risks.

Better connections from the state highway network to the airport are also a challenge. While the city is compact and travel times are relatively short, there are bottlenecks on some key routes at peak hours.

Wellington has an effective transport network

Wellington has a relatively safe and efficient transport network with high levels of public transport use and a high proportion of people who walk to and from work.

We have a transport system that our residents agree is convenient and easy to use. The network is also safe, with the number and social cost of road crashes decreasing substantially in recent years.

We have an effective public transport network that our residents used more than 35 million times this year. A minority of residents use cars to access the central city and total fuel used on Wellington roads has decreased in recent years.

We are also improving the quality and accessibility of our cycling network to offer residents another alternative to private motor vehicles.

We’re improving the network all the time

This year we:

 

Our transport activities contribute to us being:

People centred: They provide people with accessible and safe transport choices, from their homes to shops, for work, recreation and pleasure, including walkways and bikeways.

Connected: They allow people to connect with people and places in the central city for businesses, work or leisure.

An eco-city: They reflect a commitment to sustainable, safe and efficient transport choices, including walking and biking.

A dynamic central city: They provide for easy and affordable movement to and around the central city, especially by walking. They link people with places, events and activities and with commerce, business and trade.

 

7.1
Transport
Waka

We manage the transport network so it is sustainable, safe and efficient

 

What we do

Between 200,000 and 300,000 people use some form of the city’s transport network every day, including city residents, commuters and visitors.

Wellingtonians are enthusiastic users of public transport, and an effective public transport network helps reduce congestion and reduces the city’s carbon emissions. A high proportion of residents walk and cycle to work instead of using private cars. Our activities include:

  • transport planning
  • vehicle network
  • passenger transport network
  • pedestrian and cycle network
  • network-wide control
  • ​road safety.

What we achieved

We worked with the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) on major projects. We obtained funding approval from the NZTA for the detailed design of a comprehensive roading upgrade in central Johnsonville. Construction work is planned to start in late 2014 and to be completed in 2015.

We provided technical advice on several projects including the Basin Bridge, Memorial Park, Karo Drive, and Buckle Street to Cobham Drive improvements. We also provided expert witness evidence to the Basin Bridge Board of Inquiry.

The Regional Land Transport Committee adopted a Bus Rapid Transit option to operate on the core public transport spine between the Railway Station and Wellington Hospital (and beyond). We are working with GWRC and the NZTA to establish governance and project management structures for this project.

We improved the resilience of the roading network and completed remedial and upgrade work around the city. We completed investigation and design work for earthquake-strengthening the Hataitai Bus Tunnel. We continued remedial work on the Aotea Quay Bridge and completed 104 bridge condition assessments. We also renewed 11 existing retaining walls and built 11 new retaining walls.

After the June 2013 storm, we repaired 25 sites along the south coast. This remedial work will continue over the next two years. We also provided project or site-specific approvals for 279 roads or part-roads to enable the rollout of ultrafast broadband.

We expanded and upgraded the pedestrian and cycle networks. The Tawa Valley walking and cycling path was completed in May 2014. We completed plans for protected cycle lanes in Island Bay. We also developed cycle network plans for Tawa, Newtown, Berhampore, Kilbirnie, Lyall Bay, Miramar and Strathmore. We installed 25 cycle racks around the city, installed 152 cycle boxes at intersections in the Central Business District and marked a cycle lane in Evans Bay Parade. We also repaired 108 bus shelters, and 2.7 km of handrails and safety fences.

We improved road safety. We received 734 submissions during our consultation on a proposal to lower the speed limit to 30km/h through most of the Central Business District. If approved, we expect the new speed limit to be introduced by the end of 2014. We continued minor safety works aligned to the NZTA Safer Journeys programme, which focused on accident black spot locations. This included driver feedback signs, school safety and speed limits.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
7.1.1  Transport Planning1
Expenditure 1,038 637 (401) 400
Revenue (135) (41) 94 (70)
Net Expenditure 903 596 (307) 330
7.1.2  Vehicle network2
Expenditure 21,362 21,866 504 20,784
Revenue (4,459) (1,260) 3,199 (4,967)
Net Expenditure 16,903 20,606 3,703 15,817
7.1.3  Cycle network3
Expenditure 441 519 78 313
Revenue (10) (20) (10) (18)
Net Expenditure 431 499 68 295
7.1.4  Passenger transport network4
Expenditure 1,552 1,719 167 1,309
Revenue (997) (1,001) (4) (974)
Net Expenditure 555 718 163 335
7.1.5  Pedestrian network5
Expenditure 6,008 6,177 169 6,032
Revenue (112) (39) 73 (139)
Net Expenditure 5,896 6,138 242 5,893
7.1.6  Network-wide control and management
Expenditure 6,125 6,432 307 5,763
Revenue (1,759) (2,053) (294) (1,545)
Net Expenditure 4,366 4,379 13 4,218
7.1.7  Road safety
Expenditure 5,811 5,970 159 5,410
Revenue (1,525) (1,851) (326) (1,245)
Net Expenditure 4,286 4,119 (167) 4,165
  1. Over budget mainly due to unbudgeted costs relating to the Board of Inquiry for the Basin Bridge.
  2. Under budget due to assets, which have been vested to Council. The value of these assets is reflected as income. Also depreciation and interest expenditure is less than budgeted.
  3. Under budget due to lower depreciation expenditure.
  4. Under budget due to lower interest expenditure and favourable bus shelter advertising revenue.
  5. Under budget due to lower depreciation expenditure and due to assets, which have been vested to Council. The value of these assets is reflected as income.
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
7.1.2  Vehicle network6
Expenditure 19,278 20,417 1,139 27,675
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a 1,300   n/a
7.1.3  Cycle network
Expenditure 1,886 1,729 (157) 1,353
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
7.1.4  Passenger transport network
Expenditure 171 165 (6) 1,033
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
7.1.5  Pedestrian network7
Expenditure 3,775 4,820 1,045 4,674
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
7.1.6  Network-wide control and management8
Expenditure 1,891 2,140 249 2,529
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
7.1.7  Road safety9
Expenditure 1,873 2,201 328 2,542
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a 203   n/a
    1. Under budget mainly due to the reprogramming of the Hataitai bus tunnel upgrade into 14/15 and due to the purchase of Aotea Quay land not proceeding.
    2. Under budget mainly due to a decision not to proceed with the rollout of new rubbish bins on the back of trial results and savings on the footpath renewal programme.
    3. Under budget due to savings in sign renewals.
    4. Under budget mainly due a delay in the supply of components required for street lighting renewals. Savings were also achieved in some renewal projects relating to fences and guardrails.

How we performed

We had decreases in resident perceptions of the ease of movement around the city, although peak travel times between the CBD and suburbs were similar to last year. We achieved the majority of our targets for the quality of our transport infrastructure but we failed to achieve our satisfaction measures for transport infrastructure.

We measure the efficient movement of people and goods

Residents’ (%) agreement that the transport system allows easy movement around the city – vehicle users and pedestrians

Peak travel times between CBD and suburbs
  2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14
Miramar 9.0–19.0 8.0–20.0 10.0–15.0 11.0–13.3
Karori 8.0–20.0 8.5–27.0 9.0–24.0 10.8–13.4
Island Bay 8.0–16.0 7.0–14.0 8.0–21.0 10.4–15
Johnsonville 7.0–24.0 7.0–28.0 7.0–26.0 7.8–19.0

Target is to maintain or improve on these times.

Source: City Networks

We measure the movement towards more sustainable transport options

Mode of transport into the central city (weekdays)

Cyclists and pedestrians entering the CBD weekdays

Result: 836 cyclists (target: increase from 2012/13; 2012/13: 862); 5,875 pedestrians (target: increase from 2012/13; 2012/13: 5,480).

Source: City Networks

We measure this performance standard using a one-week survey in March each year. Results can vary from year to year depending on weather conditions when the survey is conducted. In the 2013 census, 3.5% of Wellington City residents cycled to work and 17.3% walked to work. This compared to the 2006 census when 2.1% cycled and 15.3% walked to work.

Over the past four years we have developed relationships with 26 Wellington schools through the School Travel Plan programme. This year, we worked closely with 15 Wellington schools to look at road safety for children travelling to and from school, and investigate ways to encourage more children to walk or scooter to school. Initiatives include needs assessments for individual schools, peer-led active transport promotion, the development of drop-off zones and student involvement in road engineering improvements to remedy identified road safety issues.

Cable car passenger numbers

Result: 953,101 passengers (target: 1,084,400; 2012/13: 1,060,458; 2011/12: 1,067,634)

Source: Wellington Cable Car Ltd

Patronage was affected by construction-related breakdowns in the first half of the year and a mild winter. Improved bus routes and initial lack of availability of Snapper continued to reduce student passenger numbers. Snapper was added as a payment option on the Cable Car in February 2014.

We measure the standard of transport infrastructure and service

Residents’ (%) condition rating of the network – roads and footpaths (good and very good)

Chorus has carried out more trenching work on roads and footpaths as part of the roll-out of the ultrafast broadband network, which may have contributed to this result.

Requests for service

Result: we responded to 84% of urgent requests for service within two hours (target: 100%; 2012/13: 97%; 2011/12: 97%; 2010/11: 100%) and 89% of non-urgent request for service within 15 days (target: 100%; 2012/13: 96%; 2011/12: 97%; 2010/11: 100%).

Source: City Networks

Performance was adversely impacted by the June 2013 storm and the July 2013 earthquake, when resources were redirected to address the highest priority urgent response work.

Roads (%) which meet smooth roads standards (smooth roads – measured by Smooth Travel Exposure based on NAASRA counts)

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with street lighting in the central city and suburban areas

The street lighting network is jointly maintained by the Council and Wellington Electricity. The storms at the start of the year caused significant street lighting outages. These were not repaired in a timely manner because higher priority issues were being attended to. The Council is investigating the introduction of new street lighting technology (including LED lights), which will improve the quality of the service.

Footpath condition rating  % compliant with WCC standards

Result: 97% (target: 97%; 2012/13: 92%; 2011/12: 97%; 2010/11: 97%).

Source: City Networks

Street lighting (%) for major roads (arterial, principal and collector roads) meets national standards

Result: 93% of lights comply (target: 100%; 2012/13: 93%; 2011/12: 94%; 2010/11: 93%).

Source: City Networks

Council has undertaken a number of initiatives during the year designed to improve the safety and experience of cycling in the city. These include cycle-friendly grates over sumps, stop boxes for cyclists at intersections and speed limit reductions. The Council also agreed to significantly increase its investment in cycling in the 2014/15 year to improve safety further.

Residents (%) who agree that WCC transport network services provided good value for money

Result: 64% of residents agree that Council transport network provides good value for money (target: 75%; 2012/13: 65%)

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

Sea-wall and retaining wall condition rating

Result: 91% of walls are rated ‘3’ or better – ‘1’ being very good and ‘5’ very bad (target: 90%; 2012/13: 91%; 2011/12: 95%).

Source: WCC Infrastructure

Quarry

Result: achieved (target: to meet legislative compliance)

Source: City Networks

We measure progress towards increasing transport safety

Road casualties (per 10,000 population):

Targets (maximum per 10,000 population): Vehicle 15.2; Pedestrians 4; Cyclists 3.3

  2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14
Vehicles 47.2 29.2 26.3 12.9
Pedestrians 3.7 3.7 3.3 3.1
Cyclists 3.3 2.3 3.3 3.2

Source: NZ Transport Agency

 

7.2
Parking
Ratonga tūnga waka
Top

Parking in the CBD is important for shoppers, tourists, and those working and visiting the city

 

What we do

We provide about 10% of the parking in central Wellington. This consists mainly of on-street parking with the addition of some off-street parking.

What we achieved

We transferred contracted parking services back in-house with the new service taking effect 1 July 2014.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
7.2.1  Parking1
Expenditure 11,553 11,154 (399) 10,702
Revenue (24,734) (26,792) (2,058) (25,427)
Net Expenditure (13,181) (15,638) (2,457) (14,725)
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
7.2.1  Parking
Expenditure 1 1 - (3)
Unspent portion
of budget to be
​carried forward
n/a -   n/a
  1. Over budget due to lower enforcement revenue and one-off costs associated with transitioning parking enforcement from an external contractor to an internal Council team.

How we performed

Parking compliance and demand performance is moderate. However, residents have concerns about the parking availability.

We measure the standard of the provision of parking

On-street car park turn-over rates (cars per day) – weekdays and weekends

On-street car park average occupancy (%)

Result: Overall occupancy 74% (target: 75%; 2012/13: 75%; 2011/12: 65%; 2010/11: 76%)

Zone Weekday occupancy Weekend occupancy
Cable / Civic 61% 91%
Cuba / Tory / Courtenay 64% 84%
Lambton / Terrace / Aitken 84% 81%

Source: WCC Infrastructure

On-street car park compliance – time restrictions and payment

We measure the percentage of cars that comply with the two-hour time restriction for on-street parking and the percentage of occupied car parks that have had an appropriate payment made.

Residents’ satisfaction with the availability of on-street car parking

We are working with the retail and hospitality sectors to explore options for a more targeted approach to parking fees and time limits. Our intention is to ensure there are a reasonable number of car parks available in different parts of the city at different times of the day.

A number of private car parking buildings are still out of operation following earthquake events during the year, although this hasn’t significantly affected the demand for, and use of, on-street car parking. We expect some of these parking buildings to be reopened during 2014/15.

Residents’ perceptions (%) that parking enforcement is fair

Result: 33% of residents believe that parking enforcement is fair (target: increase from previous year; 2012/13: 33%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

9This result is taken from a subset of the RMS sample. We received 88 responses to this question.
10This result is taken from a subset of the RMS sample. We received 65 responses to this question.