Statements of Service ​Performance

Social and recreation
Pāpori me te hākinakina

Cities are people, not buildings

Cities are made up of communities – friends and families; people who share common interests such as sports and recreational interests, intellectual pursuits, creative endeavours, political beliefs and so on; people with a common occupation or professional interest, faith, culture; or people who share a neighbourhood.

These communities hold a city together. They provide a sense of belonging and common purpose. They are the basis of ‘social cohesion’ – which is, put simply, the reality that people care about each other and act accordingly.

They support people to live their lives fully, to engage with others confidently and to take up the opportunities the city has to offer, whether that means going to a sports event with others, getting the most out of a volunteer activity, or engaging with others to influence the city’s direction.

They underpin a wider sense of city identity – a sense that, irrespective of our different interests and backgrounds, we all belong to the wider Wellington community, we all share a love for this city.

But cities are changing

People are becoming more mobile, moving from place to place in search of opportunity and a higher quality of life.

City populations are becoming more diverse – not just in terms of age and culture but also in terms of people’s lifestyles, tastes and interests.

Technology is dissolving boundaries, allowing anyone, anywhere to communicate and collaborate in real time with others throughout the world.

And economies are becoming more dependent on knowledge and creativity, driven by the premium on innovation and the desire to lift productivity.

All of these changes mean that cities will compete for people – in particular, for the highly skilled, educated people who make up a large proportion of Wellington’s population.

Our future depends on growing participation

Our future as a city – the strength of our communities, our prosperity, the number and quality of jobs on offer, and the vibrancy and excitement of city life – will depend on our ability to build participation in civic life. This year has been no exception:

 

Our social and recreation activities contribute to us being:

People centred: Access to recreation opportunities is important for people’s health and wellbeing. Our recreation facilities provide a wide range of health and wellbeing benefits to the people who use them.

Connected: They help people and communities connect and engage with each other and foster the exchange of knowledge and ideas through social, physical and virtual networks.

A dynamic central city: They respond to the diversity of individual and community needs and promote a safe and vibrant city for people to live, work and play.

 

5.1
Recreation promotion and support
Ngā rauhanga hapori

We provide a wide variety of community facilities throughout the city to encourage quality of life and healthy lifestyles.

 

What we do

Our sporting and recreation facilities encourage people of all ages to engage in activities that help them live more active and healthy lives. Some facilities also attract visitors and raise the city’s profile by hosting national and international events. Our activities include:

  • swimming pools
  • sportsfields
  • synthetic sportsfields
  • recreation centres
  • recreation partnerships
  • recreation programmes
  • recreation leases
  • playgrounds
  • marinas
  • ​golf course.

What we achieved

We upgraded the city’s swimming pools. Work started on the Keith Spry Pool upgrade, which will include a new teaching pool, children’s play pool and changing facilities. The facility was closed in April 2014 and is scheduled to reopen during the 2015 summer. We also completed a five-yearly maintenance closure of the spray pool at the Wellington Regional Aquatic Centre.

We improved the range and usability of our sportsfields. We completed a new synthetic sportsfield at Alex Moore Park, which opened in May 2014. The excess soil from this development was used to level the surface at Raroa Park. We created a new, more durable couch grass surface at Evans Bay Park, the first in the Wellington region. We also improved drainage on three fields at Nairnville Park and around the Karori Park Cricket Block, which will be used for first-class cricket and as a training venue for the Cricket World Cup.

We made our playgrounds better places for our children to play. We completed playground renewals at Grasslees Park, Surrey Street Play Area, Crawford Green and Quebec Street Play Area.

We supported events at the ASB Sports Centre and Wellington Regional Aquatic Centre (WRAC). International events included the Asia-Pacific Floorball, Trans-Tasman Futsal and the Asia-Pacific Diving International. We also hosted 13 national events at ASB Centre and 16 national events at WRAC, including the New Zealand National Age Group Swimming Championships.

And we encouraged people to participate. We completed year one of our Ki-o-Rahi development programme, which aims to increase participation in sports and recreation from communities with low participation. This is a three-year joint project with Sport NZ.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
5.1.1  Swimming Pools1
Expenditure 19,125 19,343 218 18,866
Revenue (6,940) (7,417) (477) (6,827)
Net Expenditure 12,185 11,926 (259) 12,039
5.1.2  Sportsfields
Expenditure 3,519 3,305 (214) 3,447
Revenue (329) (302) 27 (288)
Net Expenditure 3,190 3,003 (187) 3,159
5.1.3  Sportsfields (Synthetic)
Expenditure 1,175 1,253 78 1,028
Revenue (412) (453) (41) (389)
Net Expenditure 763 800 37 639
5.1.4  Recreation Centres2
Expenditure 9,387 9,859 472 9,436
Revenue (2,600) (2,762) (162) (2,512)
Net Expenditure 6,787 7,097 310 6,924
5.1.5  Recreation partnerships
Expenditure 784 776 (8) 766
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 784 776 (8) 766
5.1.6  Playgrounds3
Expenditure 723 875 152 773
Revenue (2) - 2 -
Net Expenditure 721 875 154 773
5.1.7  Marinas
Expenditure 761 781 20 534
Revenue (581) (574) 7 (578)
Net Expenditure 180 207 27 (44)
5.1.8  Golf Course
Expenditure 214 234 20 178
Revenue (59) (65) (6) (51)
Net Expenditure 155 169 14 127
5.1.9  Recreation programmes4
Expenditure 419 841 422 622
Revenue (147) (175) (28) (201)
Net Expenditure 272 666 394 421
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
5.1.1  Swimming Pools5
Expenditure 3,713 3,714 1 4,054
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a 3,802   n/a
5.1.2  Sportsfields
Expenditure 888 864 (24) 1,375
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.1.3  Sportsfields (Synthetic)
Expenditure 2,127 1,947 (180) 38
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.1.4  Recreation Centres
Expenditure 160 161 1 188
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.1.5  Recreation partnerships6
Expenditure 108 132 24 265
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.1.6  Playgrounds
Expenditure 514 505 (9) 269
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.1.7  Marinas7
Expenditure 126 142 16 96
Unspent portion
of budget to be
​carried forward
n/a -   n/a
  1. Operating revenue is under budget mainly due to the fitness centres.
  2. Under budget due to lower interest costs for the ASB Sports Centre.
  3. Under budget due to reduced personnel and depreciation expenditure.
  4. Under budget due to reduced personnel expenditure.
  5. Under budget due to delays with the upgrade of Keith Spry Pool.
  6. Under budget due to development of a Basin Reserve master plan, which delayed progression on some renewals.
  7. Under budget due to a minor saving in capital renewal work.

How we performed

User satisfaction with most services and facilities has improved, although perception of value for money has declined slightly. Use of our facilities was similar to previous years and has increased in some areas.

We understand the standard of the services we provide, and the value the public sees in them

User’s (%) satisfaction with recreation services and facilities

Residents (%) who agree that WCC recreation services and facilities provide good value for money

Result: 59% (target: 80%; 2012/13: 61%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

The results for this measure have decreased substantially since we changed our survey methodology in 2012/13. We will review the target during the development of the next Long-term Plan.

We understand the reach and usage of the services we provide

Visits to Wellington City Council swimming pools

Attendance was below target because of the maintenance closure of the Spray Pool at the Wellington Regional Aquatic Centre, the closure of Keith Spry Pool for upgrading, and the cool summer which affected attendance at our summer pools.

All our recreation centres had reduced attendance this year – the most significant being the Nairnville Recreation Centre, which we had to close to replace the roof.

ASB Centre courts % utilisation – peak and off-peak

Result: Peak = 41% (target 61%; 2012/13: 41%). Off-peak = 39% (target 30%; 2012/13: 28%).

Source: ASB Centre

Overall attendance increased by 16.5% this year. Peak attendance increased 1.2% and off-peak attendance increased by 37.5%. During the year we adjusted our peak/off-peak timetable to better reflect centre use for junior sport immediately after the school day.

Visits to the ASB Centre – peak and off-peak

Result: Peak = 332,539 (target 453,150; 2012/13: 324,694). Off-peak = 274,075 (target 145,350; 2012/13: 199,201).

Source: ASB Centre

See comment for previous measure.

Outdoor sportsfields – % of scheduled sports games that are played

Result: Winter = 78% (target: 80%; 2012/13: 84%). Summer = 89% (target: 90%; 2012/13: 94%).

Source: WCC Parks, Sports and Recreation

Artificial sportsfields % utilisation – peak and off-peak (summer and winter)

Result: Winter peak = 76% (target 80%; 2012/13: 79%). Off-peak = 18% (target 15%; 2012/13: 19%).
Summer peak = 35% (target 60%; 2012/13: 39%). Off-peak = 16% (target 10%; 2012/13: 13%).

Source: WCC Parks, Sports and Recreation

Summer peak use has reduced in percentage terms but the total hours of use have increased. The new field at St Patrick’s College has enabled higher use albeit at lower than targeted levels.

College artificial sportsfields % utilisation for WCC hours: (summer and winter).

Result: Winter = 66% (target 80%; 2012/13: 79%). Summer = 34% (target 60%; 2012/13: 36%).

Source: WCC Parks, Sports and Recreation

Use was below target at St Patrick’s College but on target at Wellington College.

Marina’s berths and boatsheds occupancy

 

5.2
Community participation and support
Tautoko hapori
Top

We support a citywide network of community spaces and libraries, support community organisations, and provide homes for people whose needs are not met by state housing or the private housing market.

 

What we do

We want Wellington to be a people-centred city – a city that supports diverse and inclusive communities. We support a network of community spaces and libraries to provide a focal point for community activities and programmes. We also support community leadership and advocacy to strengthen community resilience and safety.

We partner with Police and social agencies to coordinate a citywide approach to homelessness. By providing social housing, we ensure people’s basic needs are met. Our activities include:

  • libraries
  • access support (Leisure Card)
  • community advocacy and support
  • grants (social and recreation)
  • community centres and halls
  • ​housing.

What we achieved

We won awards for our housing programme. We won the following awards for our management and engagement work:

We won the following awards for the Central Park Apartments project:

We made it easier to access our growing library catalogue. We introduced more self-issue units in some libraries. This year, our e-book collection grew by 37% and the number of issues grew by 78%. We also increased our electronic resources including launching Zinio, an online database offering digital access to more than 150 magazine titles.

We supported the city’s vulnerable residents. We worked closely with government, service providers and community organisations to implement the Te Mahana strategy. We also continued supporting an outreach service coordinated by the Soup Kitchen to provide support for the city’s rough sleepers and vulnerable community.

We strengthened the city’s social infrastructure and community connections. We helped build resilience within vulnerable communities and supported local initiatives such as volunteer services, neighbourhood support and community patrols. We also ensured residents had the opportunity to participate in communities of choice and access support and resources that respond to their needs.

We continued upgrading our housing. We have completed the first six years of our 20-year upgrade programme in partnership with the Crown. Construction began at Berkeley Dallard Apartments and Marshall Court, with both projects on-track for completion by the end of 2014. We are seeking tenders for the Kotuku (Kilbirnie) Project.

We helped our housing communities to grow. We undertook tenant wellbeing programmes, which focused on increasing inclusiveness and connectedness, including celebrating Neighbours Day for the third time in March 2014. Tenants are beginning to take the lead, organising 14 events including Chinese New Year. Primetimers, a positive aging programme for over-80s, is going from strength to strength and we had 16 tenants graduate from the Healthy Lifestyles Programme.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
5.2.1  Libraries1
Expenditure 21,595 21,062 (533) 20,104
Revenue (1,594) (2,082) (488) (1,832)
Net Expenditure 20,001 18,980 (1,021) 18,272
5.2.2  Access Support
Expenditure 26 28 2 125
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 26 28 2 125
5.2.3  Community Advocacy
Expenditure 1,635 1,408 (227) 1,617
Revenue (133) (28) 105 (190)
Net Expenditure 1,502 1,380 (122) 1,427
5.2.4  Grants (Social and Recreation)
Expenditure 3,403 3,413 10 3,312
Revenue (13) - 13 -
Net Expenditure 3,390 3,413 23 3,312
5.2.5  Housing2
Expenditure 22,888 23,658 770 21,115
Revenue (45,418) (50,917) (5,499) (47,011)
Net Expenditure (22,530) (27,259) (4,729) (25,896)
5.2.6  Community centres and halls3
Expenditure 2,726 3,087 361 2,854
Revenue (277) (220) 57 (223)
Net Expenditure 2,449 2,867 418 2,631
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
5.2.1  Libraries
Expenditure 2,103 2,099 (4) 1,995
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.2.5  Housing4
Expenditure 27,763 37,237 9,474 31,744
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.2.6  Community centres and halls5
Expenditure 40 47 7 223
Unspent portion
of budget to be
​carried forward
n/a -   n/a
  1. Over budget due to lower operating revenue and higher personnel and depreciation expenditure.
  2. Over budget due to timing of grant income recognition relating to the Housing Upgrade Project.
  3. Under budget due to reduced personnel expenditure.
  4. Under budget mainly due to timing changes on the Housing Upgrade project. Also Housing renewals are behind budget this year.
  5. Under budget due to a minor saving in capital renewal work.

How we performed

Residents’ use and satisfaction with our libraries remains high although residents perceptions of value for money have decreased marginally. Our housing services are very high quality and are highly rated by tenants. Demand for recreation services is decreasing as our facilities face competition from other providers.

We understand the standard of the services we provide, and the value the public see in them

Libraries user (%) satisfaction with services and facilities

Result: 83% (target: 90%; 2012/13: 87%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

Libraries – residents’ (%) satisfaction with range and variety of collection

Result: 86% (target: 85; 2012/13: 87%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

Residents (%) who agree that library services and facilities provide good value for money

Result: 75% (target: 85%; 2012/13: 76%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

We understand the reach and usage of recreation services

Users of programmes – recreation centre programmes

The decrease in programme use is a reflection of the decrease in recreation centre use. Competition in the school holiday programme has affected use. Note: these results exclude the ASB Centre.

Number of uses of Leisure Card

Residents’ (%) rating of their ease (easy or very easy) of access to WCC recreation facilities and programmes

Result: 62% (target 85%; 2012/13: 55%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

We measure the standard of the housing services we provide

Wellington City Council housing tenants’ satisfaction (%) with services and facilities 5

Wellington City Council housing tenants (%) that rate the overall condition of their house/apartment as good or very good

City Housing compliance with legislative requirements

Result: all City Housing services and facilities complied with all legislative requirements (eg Residential Tenancies Act and building warrant of fitness). (Target: compliance; 2012/13: compliant).

Source: WCC City Housing

Wellington City Council housing tenants (%) who feel safe in their complex at night

Wellington City Council housing tenants (%) who report positive social contact

Result: 88% (target: 65%; 2012/13: 87%; 2011/12: 91%; 2010/11: 90%).

Source: WCC Housing Tenants Survey

We measure the use and demand of the social housing resource

Occupancy rate of available housing facilities

Result: 98% (target: 90%; 2012/13: 94%; 2011/12: 83%; 2010/11: 86%).

Source: WCC City Housing

All tenants (existing and new) housed within policy

Result: 99% (target: 98%; 2012/13: 98%).

Source: WCC City Housing

Residents (%) who rate services and facilities as good value for money

Result: 85% (target: 85%; 2012/13: 85%; 2011/12: 83%; 2010/11: 83%).

Source: WCC Housing Tenants Survey

We track the progress of the housing upgrade project

Milestones for housing upgrade project

Result: Partially achieved. Target: meet all milestones, design standards and budgets (2012/13: achieved).

Source: WCC City Housing

Design standards were achieved across the projects. The upgrade of Berkeley Dallard and Etona project was slightly delayed and came in under budget. The Marshall Court project was started later due to resource consent delays and a need to alter construction sequencing.

See “What we achieved” for more information about our housing upgrade project.

We understand the effectiveness of our community support services

Community groups (%) satisfied with Council relationships

Grant recipients – result: 82% (target: 90%; 2012/13: 77%).

Contract funded organisations – result: 88% (target: 90%; 2012/13: 94%).

Source: WCC Community Networks Grants survey and Community Networks contracts survey6

Residents’ neighbourliness behaviour

Result: 90% of residents have displayed ‘neighbourliness’ behaviour (target: 65%; 2012/13: 92%).

Source: WCC Residents Monitoring Survey

Accessible Wellington Action Plan initiatives planned for year progressed or completed

Result: 95% (target: 80%; 2012/13: 81%).

Source: WCC Community Networks

Key projects include: an assisted voting programme for the 2013 local elections; the Council now uses “popdoc” for its annual report and annual plan, which enable these documents to be presented in accessible formats; and improvements in the design and construction of pedestrian kerb ramps, tactile pavers and footpath surfaces. Accessibility improvements are also being made across a range of other council services and projects.

We understand the effectiveness of our recreation- support distribution

The proportion of grants funds successfully allocated (through milestones being met)

Result: 100% (target: 95%; 2012/13: 100%).

Source: WCC Community Networks

Proportion of outcomes delivered (previous projects – weighted by % value)

Result: 100% (target: 90%; 2012/13: 96%).

Source: WCC Community Networks

We understand the reach and use of the services we provide

Libraries – residents (%) who are registered members

Result: 74% (target: 75%; 2012/13: 67%; 2011/12: 61%; 2010/11: 78%).

Source: Wellington City Libraries

Libraries – physical visits and online visits

In 2012/13 we reduced the target for online visits because we changed the measurement methodology, which we expected to decrease our results. As this decrease has not occurred, we will review the target during the development of the next Long-term Plan.

Library programmes – estimated attendees

Result: 75,525 (target: 70,000; 2012/13: 81,273; 2011/12: 95,544; 2010/11: 89,886).

Source: Wellington City Libraries

Library items issued

E-library users satisfaction (%) with the online library collection

Result: 78% (target: 67%; 2012/13: 70%).

Source: Wellington City Libraries

Occupancy rates (%) of Wellington City Council community centres and halls

Result: 35% (target: 60%; 2012/13: 30%).

Source: WCC Community Networks

We changed the methodology for calculating occupancy rates, which now combines the measure for community centres and community halls. The combined measure calculates occupancy based on the total number of hours the facility can be booked rather than a mix of bookable and staffed hours. For 2014/15, we have reduced the target to a new stretch target of 45%.

Homelessness – % of known homeless people supported by agencies

Target: 100%. This measure was intended to form part of the Te Mahana homelessness strategy. However, the strategy has not yet been fully implemented and therefore the information is not being collected.

Source: WCC Community Networks

 

5.3
Public health and safety
Hauora tūmatanui me te haumanu
Top

We work to protect Wellingtonians from threats to their health and safety.

 

What we do

Public confidence in the safety of the city’s streets and suburbs is a top priority. Wellington has a reputation of being a safe city with a vibrant CBD. Wellington’s location makes earthquake-preparedness particularly important, though the city is also at risk of other civil emergencies such as flooding and tsunami. We have legislative obligations to maintain public health standards by regulating food and liquor outlets, animals, trade waste and managing environmental noise problems. We also provide public toilets, cemeteries and crematorium services as a vital public health function. Our activities include:

  • burials and cremations
  • public toilets
  • public health regulations
  • city safety
  • ​Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office (WREMO).

What we achieved

We maintained our public facilities. We constructed the Seaforth Memorial Gardens and replaced the public toilet in the Karori Cemetery, and we developed a Greek Orthodox section at the Makara Cemetery. We refurbished the Balaena Bay toilets and the Alex Moore Park Pavilion.

We regulated public health. We adopted the Provisional Local Alcohol Policy, which sets rules for sale of alcohol in the city and we developed a strategy to create a safe and vibrant late-night environment.

We helped make the city safer. We developed the Graffiti Management Plan, an online guide, and supported community-led initiatives to manage graffiti. We also developed a partnership with the newly formed CBD Policing team to address antisocial behaviour in Cuba Mall, and we worked with Police to improve safety in nine city car parks.

The Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office (WREMO) helped prepare us for a future emergency. WREMO, with the Council’s internal resiliency units, has been implementing the Community-driven Emergency Management (CDEM) Group Plan. This year we:

In conjunction with Massey University, we launched a new International Centre of Excellence in Community Resilience (ICoE:CR). The vision of the ICoE:CR is to be an internationally recognised centre of excellence to research and enable community resilience to disasters, actively collaborating with individuals, organisations and communities in the Wellington Region.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
5.3.1  Burials and Cremations1
Expenditure 1,830 1,704 (126) 1,760
Revenue (856) (865) (9) (865)
Net Expenditure 974 839 (135) 895
5.3.2  Public Toilets
Expenditure 2,440 2,364 (76) 2,164
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 2,440 2,364 (76) 2,164
5.3.3  Public Health Regulations
Expenditure 4,508 4,483 (25) 3,878
Revenue (2,685) (2,591) 94 (2,533)
Net Expenditure 1,823 1,892 69 1,345
5.3.4  City Safety2
Expenditure 1,634 1,372 (262) 2,105
Revenue (10) - 10 (59)
Net Expenditure 1,624 1,372 (252) 2,046
5.3.5  WREMO
Expenditure 1,285 1,300 15 2,010
Revenue (25) (39) (14) (148)
Net Expenditure 1,260 1,261 1 1,862
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
5.3.1  Burials and Cremations
Expenditure 320 308 (12) 110
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.3.2  Public Toilets
Expenditure 484 537 53 734
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.3.4  City Safety
Expenditure - - - -
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
5.3.5 WREMO
Expenditure 22 22 - -
  1. Over budget due to increased personnel and maintenance expenditure.
  2. Over budget due to a change in accounting procedures with the new roading corridor contract. An internal cost transfer has been removed, this has no impact from a Council-wide perspective.

How we performed

The city is safer and healthier as the result of our work.

We understand the effectiveness of our public health and safety services and programmes

Dog control – complaints received (% of registered dogs)

Result: 30% (target: maintain or improve from 2012/13; 2012/13: 26%)

Source: WCC Public Health

Response to service requests – dog control

Result: We responded to 97% of urgent requests within one hour (target: 100%; 2012/13: 98%; 2011/12: 97%; 2010/11: 100%) and 99% of non-urgent requests within 24 hours (target: 99%; 2012/13: 99%; 2011/12 99%; 2010/11: 99%).

Source: WCC Public Health

Urgent requests are defined as dog attacks on people or other animals.

Food premises – number of cleaning notices and closures per year

Result: There were 32 cleaning notices and closures during the year. (no target; 2012/13: 38).

Source: WCC Public Health

Food premises (%) with excellent or very good hygiene ratings that maintain or improve their rating

Although we play a role in educating food operators, we cannot control how they operate their businesses and any subsequent change in their performance rating. We are analysing the results to see whether there is any trend that can be addressed.

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with the cleanliness of Wellington City Council public toilets (satisfied or neutral responses)

Response to service requests – public toilets

Result: We responded to 100% of urgent requests within one hour (target: 100%; 2012/13: 100%; 2011/12: 98%), and 100% of non-urgent requests within three days (target: 95%; 2012/13: 95%; 2011/12: 98%).

Source: WCC Parks, Sports and Recreation

Wellington City Council public toilets that meet required cleanliness and maintenance performance standards

Percentage of planned inspections carried out for high risk (category 3) premises

Result: 109% (Target: 100%; 2012/13: 100%)

Source: WCC Public Health

There are 260 high risk premises in the city. This year, we carried out 283 inspections of those premises.

Percentage of inspections of high risk (category 3) premises carried out during high trading hours

Result: 34% (target: 25%; 2012/13: 26%).

Source: WCC Public Health

This year, we inspected 88 of the 260 high risk premises during high trading hours. The result has increased because we reallocated our resources to monitor liquor premises at peak trading. This is a proactive response to changes and expectations under new legislation. It is a joint monitoring initiative with the Police and Regional Public Health.

4The 2011/12 figures include the ASB Centre, which opened that year. From 2012/13 onwards they are reported on separately.
5This is a postal survey sent to the head tenant of each Council Housing Unit, each with a prepaid envelope. This year, we had 633 responses.
6These are online surveys sent to grant recipients and organisations that hold multi-year contracts with WCC’s Community Services team. This year, we received 160 responses to the grants survey and 30 responses to the contracts survey. Results from 2012/13 have been updated.