Statements of Service ​Performance

Governance
​Pārongo ā-tāone

Good governance builds trust, confidence and a healthy democracy

The result of good governance is public trust and confidence in the decisions we make. The wellbeing of local democracy relies on good governance.

It’s in our interest, and the city’s, that residents understand the Council’s plans for the future. It’s also important that people have the opportunity to participate in the decision-making process.

High-quality governance is the launching pad for successful cities. We are committed to an open and transparent decision-making process, and a culture that is open for business and puts residents first.

We strive for high-quality governance because better decisions today mean a better city tomorrow.

Our activities and relationship with residents today

We engage with and support elected members, residents and ratepayers, businesses and community leaders. We try to ensure they are well-informed and can contribute meaningfully to the Council’s decision-making processes.

We keep a record of our work and provide access to the information we hold. City Archives preserves and makes available a huge range of primary information about the city’s history. Our activities include:

Residents are very satisfied (70%) with their level of involvement in the decision-making process, up from 63% in the previous year, but only 36% of residents are satisfied that Council information is easy to access.

Participation in the 2013 Wellington local body elections was 41%, up from 39% in 2010. Increasing voter turnout remains a challenge.

The way residents want to receive and respond to information is changing, in line with technology advances.

Governance and engaging with residents in the future

A key future focus is embracing new technology to improve the way we govern, inform and engage. But regardless of technological change, customer service will be front and centre of our goals and activities.

New technology will also enable us to broaden our reach with the community. We will improve our website and move to ‘self-service’ by automating transactions and using smartphone apps and social media to connect with the public. This will not be at the expense of face-to-face customer service and communication with residents and ratepayers.

We will continue to work closely with our mana whenua partners, who have a special position in the city’s history.

We govern, inform and engage

This year we:

 

Our governance activities contribute to us being:

People centred: They enhance trust and confidence in civic decision-making and encourage the community to participate in city governance. They also promote inclusiveness, celebrate social and cultural diversity, and enable us to respond to the needs and aspirations of Māori and mana whenua.

Connected: Providing information about our services allows people to use the city’s services, facilities and activities.

 

1.1
Governance, information and engagement
Pārongo, kōrerorero whānui me ngā mahi whakataunga

We want to inform people, and maintain their confidence, in our decision-making

 

What we do

Our decisions need to reflect the services that matter to the community and how much they are willing to pay for them. We ensure people are well-informed and can contribute meaningfully to Council decision-making processes. The Local Government Act 2002 sets out the decision-making, planning and accountability procedures expected of local authorities.

Other legislation requires us to keep a record of our work and provide access to the information we hold. City Archives preserves and makes available a huge range of primary information about the city’s history. Our activities include:

  • city governance and engagement
  • civic information
  • ​City Archives.

What we achieved

We managed the 2013 local body elections, which resulted in an increased turnout of 41.1% compared with 38.5% in 2010, six new Councillors being elected and three new Community Board members.

We made information more accessible. City Archives digitised plans and documents related to water supply, drainage and stormwater to support our asset planning and management. We also worked with the Museum of Wellington City & Sea to manage their archives.

We engaged with Wellington residents. In October we adopted a new Engagement Policy, which includes a public commitment to how we will engage with Wellingtonians. We held a series of forums to communicate our strategic focus and receive input into our future planning with the business, sporting, Pacific, accessibility and multicultural communities. We also worked with our Youth Council, Pacific Advisory Group, Environmental Reference Group and Accessibility Advisory Group on key projects such as our Alcohol Management Strategy and our input into the Memorial Park precinct.

We set the Council’s strategic direction. In June 2014, we adopted the 2014/15 Annual Plan. The plan sets a growth agenda for the Council and includes changes to Development Contributions and our Rates Remission Policy, which will encourage development of quality buildings, reduce compliance costs and make our processes more efficient.

And we complied with new legislative obligations. We set up an independent District Licensing Committee, in accordance with the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012, to decide on alcohol licensing applications. This year, the Committee made 741 decisions.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
1.1.1 City Governance and Engagement1
Expenditure 9,523 9,912 389 8,161
Revenue (508) (312) 196 (14)
Net Expenditure 9,015 9,600 585 8,147
1.1.2 Civic Information2
Expenditure 5,361 5,814 453 5,327
Revenue (411) (242) 169 (248)
Net Expenditure 4,950 5,572 622 5,079
1.1.3  City Archives
Expenditure 1,481 1,364 (117) 1,283
Revenue (182) (180) 2 (208)
Net Expenditure 1,299 1,184 (115) 1,075
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
1.1.1  City Governance and Engagement
Expenditure 53 110 57 -
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a - - n/a
  1. Under budget due to reduced personnel expenditure and associated overhead allocations as well as lower elections costs.
  2. ​Under budget due to reduced personnel expenditure and associated overhead allocations.

How we performed

We improved customer satisfaction with our information and engagement work. We will need to review the targets for these measures because they are based on a different survey methodology that is not comparable with our current results. The results for our information accessibility measures are also below target although we met our legislative obligations. Our service centre is very good at responding to enquiries and residents are satisfied with City Archives.

We understand how well the public is informed and engaged

Percentage of residents satisfied with the level of consultation (i.e. the right amount)

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with their involvement in Council decision-making (including neutral responses)

This year, we increased our efforts to communicate and consult about Council’s work and the results of our decision-making, which resulted in a significant performance improvement.

e-democracy participation – number of ePetitions and number of people that participate

This year, we received 10 ePetitions and 283 people participated. This compared with 14 e-petitions and 2,148 participants in 2012/13.

There is no target for this performance measure.

Source: WCC Democratic Services

We measure how easy it is for residents to access information and whether that information is available in a timely manner

Council and committee agendas (%) made available to the public five days prior to the meeting

Result: 59% (target: 80%; 2012/13: 80%; 2011/12: 74%; 2010/11: 75%)

Source: WCC Democratic Services

The Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 requires us to make all agendas and reports available two days before meetings. We have set a higher standard for ourselves by aiming for five days.

Performance was partly affected by the Council’s move to a new governance structure after the 2013 Local Government Election, which resulted in an increase in the number of committees.

This year, 100% of agendas were made publicly available at least two days prior to the meetings.

Residents (%) who agree that Council information is easy to access

This year, 22% of residents believed that Council information is not easy to access and 42% of residents neither agreed nor disagreed.

Residents (%) who agree that the Council website is easy to navigate and get information from

This year, 16% of residents disagreed that our website is easy to navigate and 21% neither agreed nor disagreed. 15% of residents disagreed that our website is easy to get information from and 27% neither agreed nor disagreed.

In response to the above results, last year we had focus groups where we asked people about our consultation and communication. We learnt that a lot of people do not know what Council does or how to have a say in our decision-making. In response, we have been highlighting the value and benefits of Council’s work through the Our Wellington page in The Dominion Post. We have made sure that we let people know how their input into our decision-making was used and what resulted. We are also ensuring that people can easily access Council information through search engines like Google.

 
Contact Centre calls that are answered within 30 seconds and emails that are answered within 24 hours

Contact Centre calls that are answered within 30 seconds and emails that are answered within 24 hours (continued)

We measure our success at protecting the city’s historic information and making it available to the public

User satisfaction with City Archive services and facilities

 

1.2
Māori and mana whenua partnerships
Whai wāhitanga Māori (tae noa ki te mana whenua)
Top

We have an obligation to ensure the views of mana whenua are heard.

 

What we do

We ensure the special position of mana whenua Ngāti Toa Rangatira and Taranaki Whānui ki te Upoko o te Ika is acknowledged and reflected in the way we make decisions about the city and its resources. We also ensure their contribution to Wellington’s heritage and future is fully and publicly acknowledged. We work with mana whenua to explore opportunities for the city emerging from settlement of their historic Treaty of Waitangi claims and engage with the wider Māori community in particular on issues of specific interest to them.

What we achieved

We welcomed a new Council and new Wellington residents. The new Wellington City Council was formally welcomed by mana whenua at the inauguration ceremony on 30 October 2013. On 14 December almost 100 newcomers attended He Kāinga Hou – A New Home: In the Footsteps of Kupe, at Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Mokopuna. Council, the kura whānau and mana whenua hosted a day of Māori culture and a guided tour to Oruaiti Pā site within the Oruaiti Reserve.

We hosted events. Te Rā o Waitangi (6 February) took place at Te Raukura, te wharewaka o Pōneke with co-host Wellington Tenths Trust. For the second year, we assisted the Te Whanganui-a-Tara Māori Secondary Schools Teachers Association to host Te Rā Haka at the ASB Sports Centre. Approximately 500 students from Seatoun to Ōtaki came together to learn a local iwi haka.

We assisted this year’s Matariki celebrations in collaboration with many organisations, delivering almost 100 events. One highlight was renowned artist Johnson Witihera’s Waituhi mural project in Opera House Lane. We also launched a new website for the Matariki festival (matarikiwellington.org).

And we installed a new pou whenua at Courtenay Place marking the significant iwi site of the Waitangi Stream. An early morning cultural blessing was provided by mana whenua kaumatua.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
1.2.1  Māori and Mana Whenua Partnerships
Expenditure 225 225 - 222
Revenue (1) - 1 (5)
Net Expenditure 224 225 1 217
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
1.2.1  Māori and Mana Whenua Partnerships
Expenditure - - - -

How we performed

We measure the health of our relationship with mana whenua

Mana whenua partner evaluation – satisfaction with Council relationship

Wellington City Council has two mana whenua partnerships: Te Runanga o Toa Rangatira Inc representing Ngāti Toa, and Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust representing Taranaki Whānui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika (Taranaki Whānui).

Both our mana whenua partners have experienced a year of significant internal changes and, in recognition of this, Council’s elected members and officers have been supportive and understanding of our partners’ changing environment.

Overall, the relationship is perceived to be positive and effective by our partners. One partner noted that the Council was creating a stronger culture with respect to including mana whenua in decision-making processes and management of resources, and that there was good engagement by senior Council staff and Councillors. However, one partner also noted that there needs to be more clarity about the relationship and links at different levels of the organisation. It was reported that there needed to be further integration and normalisation of tangata whenua participation in decision-making processes.

There was some concern that as the Council develops further specific agreements with its partners, that the relationship could become focused on compliance or a business relationship rather than an enduring treaty-based partnership.

It was suggested that Wellington’s local councils could look to coordinate their mana whenua liaison more efficiently. This would be less time-consuming and more efficient than working separately with several different councils.

The partners agreed that Wellington was a great place to do business. Reasons for this were Wellington’s capital status, its location, and access to major transport routes.

It was reported that the Council has adopted and supported more environmentally sustainable practices recently. Further development of this focus and supporting initiatives are needed to ensure future sustainability.

Source: Mana whenua partners’ relationship evaluation 2014

We measure the engagement of the city’s Māori residents

Māori residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making

Result: 56% of Māori surveyed were satisfied or neutral with regard to their involvement with decision-making (target: 85%; 2012/13: 60%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014