Statements of Service ​Performance

Environment
Taiao

The world is facing unprecedented environmental and resource challenges

The global population is growing. Oil reserves are declining. Many parts of the world face shortages of food, water and other resources, and the climate is changing and becoming more unpredictable.

These changes affect all of us – either directly, for example through rising fuel prices or extreme weather events, or indirectly, such as when we hear about resource conflicts or climate-related natural disasters in the news.

These challenges are city challenges

Most of the world’s people live in cities, and cities are net consumers of the world’s resources. Cities contribute to global environmental problems, and are especially vulnerable to their impacts.

But, if cities are sometimes the problem, they must also be the solution. Cities have the potential to lead the world in responding to these environmental pressures. In cities, we can find new ways of living that achieve high quality of life without compromising the environment on which we rely.

Wellington has a head start in adapting to a low-carbon future

Wellington is a small and relatively compact city where many people get around on foot or by bus. Our economy relies on knowledge-based industries such as government and the creative sector – not on polluting or resource-intensive industries.

We have an abundance of renewable energy sources such as wind power, and a green landscape that not only provides opportunities for residents to enjoy the outdoors but also gives the city access to carbon credits.

We also have a population that values and is committed to the environment.

We’re not resting on our laurels

This year we:

 

Our environment activities contribute to us being:

People centred: High-quality natural environments enhance Wellington’s unique ‘sense of place’, making it an even better place to live, work and play. They attract visitors and provide attractive, safe and accessible opportunities for leisure and recreation.

Connected: Accessible and high-quality natural and green environments encourage people to gather together, share activities and connect with each other. Networks of green spaces and corridors link the city with its coastline and beaches. Conservation connects people with the environment and links the present to the future.

Eco-city: High-quality natural and green environments protect and enhance our biodiversity and contribute to off-setting our carbon emissions. They model Wellington’s leadership role as capital city of a clean and green New Zealand and as a leading sustainable city of the 21st century.

A dynamic central city: A reliable and adequate supply of clean and safe water is critical for people to live, work, study and play in the central city and increasingly it will distinguish Wellington from other cities as a desirable and healthy place to live and establish a business.

 

2.1
Gardens, beaches and green open spaces
Ngā wāhi wātea me ngā mahi papa atawhai

We manage the city’s natural environment and gardens in ways that balance conservation and enhancement with opportunities for enjoyment and recreation.

 

What we do

Wellington is surrounded by nature. We preserve the city’s unique environment and protect and restore its biodiversity. A high-quality natural environment enhances the city’s unique ‘sense of place’ and provides attractive, safe and accessible places for leisure and recreation. Our aim is to enhance enjoyment of these areas.

Our activities include:

  • local parks and open spaces
  • botanic gardens of Wellington
  • beaches and coastal operations
  • roads and open spaces
  • Town Belt and reserves
  • community environmental initiatives
  • walkways
  • biodiversity (pest management).

What we achieved

We upgraded and planned the future of our parks and open spaces. We completed the Grasslees Reserve upgrade with partial funding from the Charles Plimmer Bequest. Oruaiti Reserve was the first reserve in Wellington to receive the internationally recognised Green Flag accreditation. We continued building work on the heritage Halfway House in Glenside Reserve. We completed Our Capital Spaces, the new open space and recreation plan, which will direct Council’s priorities for the next 5–10 years.

We cleaned up the city after the storm. The June 2013 storm caused major tree damage, erosion and sea-wall damage around the city. We ensured that roads and key infrastructure were cleared quickly. Most clean-up work was completed by October 2013 with tree removal continuing throughout the year. We are continuing repair work on sea-walls and erosion around the coast.

We managed the botanic gardens for the benefit of all. We commissioned the design of the Children’s Garden in the Botanic Garden, which is funded by the Charles Plimmer Bequest and a fundraising campaign. We hosted Power Plant as part of the New Zealand Festival, which attracted 22,000 visitors to the Botanic Garden.

We maintained and beautified our beaches and coast. We completed coastal beautification work at Owhiro Bay and along the coastal walkway in Te Kopahou Reserve as per the South Coast Management Plan. We also maintained the Oriental Bay beaches and completed two sand shifts.

We secured the future of the Town Belt. We prepared and consulted on the draft Wellington Town Belt Bill and finalised the Wellington Town Belt Management Plan, which includes principles for working in partnership with mana whenua and protecting the Town Belt for future generations. We planted more than 50,000 eco-sourced native trees. This included restoration planting, enhancement planting within existing reserves and riparian planting to improve water quality in the Porirua Harbour.

We support community environmental initiatives. We distributed more than 32,000 native eco-sourced plants to environmental community groups and residents for planting. We continued working with Victoria University students on environmental research initiatives, and we had four summer scholars working on environmental projects.

We renewed the city’s walkways. We completed walkway renewals of the Piwakawaka Track in Odell Reserve, Mt Albert/Melrose Southern Walkway and Makara Peak Mountain Bike Park.

We protected Wellington’s biodiversity. We completed the third year of the south-west peninsula goat control project, which has resulted in a significant reduction in goats in the control area and good vegetation recovery. We have enhanced our pest plant programme in 36 key native ecosystems across the city. We continued controlling high priority weeds in the Town Belt.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.1.1  Local Parks and Open Spaces
Expenditure 8,439 8,113 (326) 7,694
Revenue (863) (454) 409 (531)
Net Expenditure 7,576 7,659 83 7,163
2.1.2  Botanical Gardens
Expenditure 4,715 4,790 75 4,510
Revenue (364) (408) (44) (379)
Net Expenditure 4,351 4,382 31 4,131
2.1.3  Beaches and Coast Operations
Expenditure 964 1,029 65 1,020
Revenue (50) (51) (1) (51)
Net Expenditure 914 978 64 969
2.1.4  Roads open spaces1
Expenditure 9,132 8,602 (530) 10,070
Revenue (553) (633) (80) (694)
Net Expenditure 8,579 7,969 (610) 9,376
2.1.5  Town belts2
Expenditure 4,783 4,420 (363) 5,070
Revenue (1,276) (209) 1,067 (422)
Net Expenditure 3,507 4,211 704 4,648
2.1.6  Community environmental initiatives
Expenditure 456 436 (20) 389
Revenue (9) - 9 (24)
Net Expenditure 447 436 (11) 365
2.1.7  Walkways
Expenditure 525 523 (2) 505
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 525 523 (2) 505
2.1.8  Biodiversity (pest management)3
Expenditure 1,397 1,097 (300) 1,123
Revenue (133) - 133 (65)
Net Expenditure 1,264 1,097 (167) 1,058
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.1.1  Local Parks and Open Spaces4
Expenditure 1,939 1,987 48 894
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a 220   n/a
2.1.2  Botanical Gardens5
Expenditure 661 886 225 1,065
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
2.1.3  Beaches and Coast Operations
Expenditure 147 192 45 116
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
  -    
2.1.5  Town belts
Expenditure 113 113 - 155
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
2.1.7 Walkways
Expenditure 158 158 - 441
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a -   n/a
  1. Over budget due to additional storm event clean-up costs and a one-off cost relating to the recalibration of street cleaning to ensure the acceptable standard of cleanliness was maintained.
  2. Under budget due to assets, which have been vested to Council. The value of these assets is reflected as income.
  3. Over budget due to increased staff and contract expenditure.
  4. Under budget mainly due to delays in the programme funded by the Plimmer Bequest including work on Watts Peninsula and planning for the Children’s Garden.
  5. Under budget due to delays in the reconfiguring of the Curators House at Otari Wilton’s Bush.

How we performed

This activity offers good value-for-money, is highly used by residents and is maintained to a high standard.

We measure the standard of the open spaces we provide

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with the quality and maintenance of local parks and reserves, gardens and beaches

Residents (%) who agree that green open spaces, gardens and beaches provide good value for money

Result: 77% (target: 90%; 2012/13: 80%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with the quality and maintenance of green open spaces

We maintain roadside vegetation to enable free and safe traffic movement. Sometimes, people ask us to remove vegetation for other reasons, which we often will not do. Some of the dissatisfaction with this service may result from this tension between our policies and people’s expectations.

We measure the use of the open spaces we provide

Number of visitors to the Botanic Garden

Result: 1,542,535 (target: 1,200,000; 2012/13: 1,141,398).

Source: Botanic Garden

Residents’ frequency (%) of usage of local parks and reserves (yearly and weekly)

Residents’ frequency (%) usage of walkways (yearly and weekly)

Residents’ frequency (%) of usage of Botanic Garden (yearly and weekly)

Residents’ frequency (%) of usage of beaches and coastal areas (yearly and weekly)

We measure the standard of our street cleaning service 1

Street cleaning (%) compliance with quality performance standards

We measure our efforts to protect and enhance biodiversity and native species health

Total number of native plantings undertaken by WCC

Result: 50,712 (target: 45,000; 2012/13: 41,155).

Source: WCC Parks, Sport and Recreation

Total number of native plants provided by WCC for community planting

Result: 32,378 (target: 32,000; 2012/13: 32,162).

Source: WCC Parks, Sport and Recreation

High value biodiversity sites (%) covered by integrated animal pest control or weed control

Result: 52% (target: 60%; 2012/13: 52%).

We did not achieve the target because we implemented a new contract model for delivering this service which has not yet run for a full year.

Source: WCC Parks, Sport and Recreation

Proportion of grant funds successfully allocated (through milestones being met)

Result: 97% (target: 95%; 2012/13: 100%).

Source: WCC Community Networks

 

2.2
Waste reduction and energy conservation
Whakaiti para, hangarua me te pena pūnga
Top

Sustainability is about meeting our needs now without burdening future generations.

 

What we do

A sustainable city uses resources efficiently, re-uses or recycles them, and only commits them to landfills as a last resort. Sustainability is about reducing the amount of energy we use and using clean energy from renewable sources. It is also about promoting a culture that values the environment and encourages pro-environment behaviour of everyone who lives, works, or studies here. Our activities include:

  • energy efficiency and conservation
  • closed landfill aftercare
  • ​waste minimisation, disposal and recycling.

What we achieved

We helped improve housing warmth and sustainability. We funded the Sustainability Trust to deliver the Warm Up Wellington project, which provided insulation retrofits to 250 low-income homes in Wellington. We delivered the Home Energy Saver Programme, which provided free home sustainability assessments to close to 400 households. We completed a national field trial for a rental housing warrant of fitness scheme.

We delivered the Smart Energy Capital programme. We provided $291,000 and leveraged another $725,000 from our partners for the Smart Energy Capital programme by:

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.2.1  Waste minimisation, disposal and recycling management1
Expenditure 11,292 12,365 1,073 10,711
Revenue (12,195) (12,393) (198) (12,079)
Net Expenditure (903) (28) 875 (1,368)
2.2.2  Closed landfills aftercare2
Expenditure (289) 477 766 (728)
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure (289) 477 766 (728)
2.2.3  Energy efficiency and conservation
Expenditure - - - -
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure - - - -
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.2.1  Waste minimisation, disposal and recycling management3
Expenditure 339 1,987 1,648 488
Unspent portion 
of budget to be 
carried forward
n/a - - n/a
2.2.2  Closed landfills aftercare
Expenditure - - - -
2.2.3  Energy efficiency and conservation
Expenditure 19 19 - 44
Unspent portion 
of budget to be 
carried forward
n/a - - n/a
  1. Under budget due to lower expenditure for landfill operations, refuse collection and depreciation. Higher than budgeted volumes of rubbish bag sales were also achieved during the year.
  2. Under budget due to a reduction in the closed landfill provision at 30 June 2014.
  3. Under budget due to delays in the Stage 4 landfill extension as a result of a protracted resource consent process.

How we performed

The services in this activity are well-used by residents and we have improved the efficiency of our waste disposal service. Council’s energy consumption was slightly higher than the previous year but we have successfully reduced our environmental footprint.

We measure how well we provide and encourage the use of recycling services to divert valuable material from the waste stream.

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with recycling and waste collection

We have been discouraging people from disposing of general rubbish without paying for Council rubbish bags or a commercial service. This is particularly prevalent in the central city. Our work included investigations and prosecutions, which may have contributed to this result.

Waste diverted from landfill and total waste to landfill (tonnes)

Diverted material includes kerbside recycling and inflows of soils that are able to be diverted. The decrease in diverted material is because, in previous years, we diverted large quantities of contaminated soil from construction projects to remediate closed sections of the landfill.

Residents’ (%) weekly usage of kerbside recycling collection service

This year, 60% of residents used kerbside recycling weekly and another 32% used it fortnightly. Performance is not an issue although we will review the measure for future years.

Kerbside recycling collected (tonnes)

The low result is from contaminated recycling not being collected. In these situations we leave information for the homeowner informing them what to include and exclude from their recycling.

We measure how efficiently we dispose of waste and its impact on the environment

Energy sourced from the Southern Landfill

Result: 7.0GWh (target: 8GWh; 2012/13: 5.2GWh; 2011/12: 8.3GWh; 2010/11: 7.4GWh).

Source: Nova Energy

Residents’ (%) agreement that waste management services provide good value for money

Result: 80% (target: 85%; 2011/12: 78%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

We measure energy use at Council sites

WCC corporate energy use (electricity and natural gas)
Properties Target Result Explanation
WCC general (now includes all gas and large electricity sites) Decrease from previous year (18,344,189 kwh) 18,454,850 kwh Gas use was higher than intended due to boiler control problems at the Civic buildings.
WCC Pools and recreation facilities Decrease from previous year (17,887,367 kwh) 18,446,633 kwh The increase is because Tawa and Karori pools were both closed for part of the previous year, which made 2012/13 energy use lower than normal. We also added a new small learner pool at Karori pool and a hydrotherapy pool at Wellington Regional Aquatic Centre.
Main CCOs Decrease from previous year (9,963,836 kwh) 9,866,969 kwh   

Source: WCC Energy Management

We measure the reduction of the Council’s environmental footprint

WCC corporate greenhouse gas emissions (tonnes CO 2- e)

The table above compares emissions from diesel, petrol, electricity, gas, LPG, flights and the Southern Landfill. This is not the Council’s full corporate greenhouse gas inventory but rather a comparison of emissions sources over time.

We did not have our corporate greenhouse gas emissions independently audited or certified in 2013/14 as planned. We decided to compile city and regional level greenhouse gas inventory information instead. This information can be found on our website.

Number of carbon credits generated from Council reserves per annum

Result: 30,913 (target: 5,000).

Source: New Zealand Emission Unit Register account

During the year, the Council received 30,913 units as part of its annual allocation of units for post-1989 forests placed either in the Emissions Trading Scheme or the Permanent Forest Sink Initiative.

 

2.3
Water
Wai
Top

Clean, safe water is essential for residents’ quality of life and wellbeing.

 

What we do

These services are delivered by Capacity Infrastructure Services. Activities include:

  • water network
  • ​water collection and treatment.

What we achieved

We upgraded the network and improved resilience. We continued upgrading the water main network to meet new firefighting standards. We installed new emergency water tanks in Seatoun, Brooklyn, Island Bay, Berhampore, Te Aro, Crofton Downs, Churton Park, Johnsonville and Karori West. Seismic upgrading of the Maupuia reservoirs and Maldive No. 2 reservoir commenced to improve the resilience of the water supply network and we decommissioned unused reservoirs in Khandallah, Karori, Karaka Bay, Woodridge, Mt Cook and Northland.

We welcomed new shareholders to Capacity. This year, Porirua City and Upper Hutt City Council’s joined Hutt and Wellington City Councils as shareholders in Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.3.1  Water Network1
Expenditure 24,260 24,517 257 24,272
Revenue (1,151) (33) 1,118 (1,558)
Net Expenditure 23,109 24,484 1,375 22,714
2.3.2  Water Collection and Treatment2
Expenditure 13,804 14,216 412 13,396
Revenue (3) - 3 (4)
Net Expenditure 13,801 14,216 415 13,392
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.3.1  Water Network3
Expenditure 10,984 11,867 883 12,170
Unspent portion
of budget to be
carried forward
n/a 710   n/a
  1. Under budget due to assets, which have been vested to Council. The value of these assets is reflected as income. Also interest expenditure is less than budgeted.
  2. Under budget due to lower bulk water charges from GWRC.
  3. Under budget due to the Hospital Prince of Wales reservoir project being put on hold as other options are investigated and delays to several renewal projects.

How we performed

Our water supply is of a very high quality and outages are rare. We see a pattern of improved water conservation. While perceptions of value for money have declined slightly, only 5% of residents believe that the service does not provide value for money.

We measure the quality of water supplied to residents

Compliance with Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand 2005

Compliance was achieved with the NZ Drinking Water Standards for all of the city’s water grading zones.

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Residents’ (%) agreement that water services provide good value for money

Result: 77% (target: 90%; 2012/13: 81%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

Customer complaints regarding water quality (taste and odour)

Result: 196 complaints (target: fewer than 200; 2012/13: 165; 2011/12: 202; 2010/11: 289).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Customer satisfaction (%) with water quality and network service

We measure the performance of services that ensure security of supply

Water pressure

Result: 96% of properties had appropriate water pressure, i.e. minimum 250kPa (target 97%; 2012/13: 96%; 2011/12: 96%; 2010/11: 96%).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Fire hydrants

Result: 99% of fire hydrants tested met New Zealand Fire Service Code of Practice for firefighting water supply requirements (target: 95%; 2012/13: 100%; 2011/12: 100%).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Water distribution network – quality grading

Result: all parts of the network retained the grading of ‘a’ to ‘b’ in the Ministry of Health quality grading (target: ‘a’ to ‘b’ grading).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

An ‘a’ grading refers to assets that are completely satisfactory with negligible or very low levels of risk.

A ‘b’ grading refers to assets that are satisfactory with very low levels of risk.

A ‘c’ grading refers to assets that are marginally satisfactory with moderate-low risk.

In 2008, the Ministry of Health graded the entire network. Annually, they ensure this grading has been retained by reviewing the Council’s replacement and/or maintenance of water pipes.

Response time to services request (%) within one hour of notification

Unaccounted for water (%) from the network

Unaccounted for water (UFW) is mainly water lost through leaks in the public and private network. It also covers water used in fire-fighting and unmetered council use. Since 2006/07, UFW has fallen from 21% to 11%, contributing to an overall reduction in the amount of water Wellington uses.

Residential water consumption (per person per day)

Result: 264 litres per person per day (target: 290 litres per person per day; 2012/13: 288; 2011/12: 282; 2010/11: 297).

Source: Capacity Infrastructures Services Ltd

Total city water consumption during the year

Result: 26.4 billion litres (target: less than 30 billion litres; 2012/13: 26.6 billion litres; 2010/11: 28.4 billion litres).

Source: Capacity Infrastructures Services Ltd

 

2.4
Wastewater
Parawai
Top

Maintaining public health and safety and having clean waterways is essential to the city’s environmental wellbeing.

 

What we do

These services are delivered by Capacity Infrastructure Services. Activities include:

  • sewage collection and disposal
  • ​sewage treatment.

What we achieved

We renewed the network and improved resilience

Wastewater network renewals were completed at 18 locations throughout the city with a strong focus on Miramar where seven renewals were completed. Three wastewater pump stations were upgraded to ensure they meet performance expectations into the future.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.4.1  Sewage collection and disposal network1
Expenditure 17,886 18,167 281 17,277
Revenue (1,859) (571) 1,288 (1,892)
Net Expenditure 16,027 17,596 1,569 15,385
2.4.2  Sewage treatment2
Expenditure 21,683 22,309 626 21,877
Revenue (1,041) (639) 402 (378)
Net Expenditure 20,642 21,670 1,028 21,499
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.4.1  Sewage collection and disposal network3
Expenditure 7,924 8,242 318 6,882
Unspent portion
of budget to be
​carried forward
n/a -   n/a
  1. Under budget due to assets, which have been vested to Council. The value of these assets is reflected as income.
  2. Under budget due to lower wastewater treatment plant costs for electricity and lower diversion of sludge to the landfill.
  3. Under budget due to savings in several renewal projects and delays in the transition from analogue to digital telemetry programme.

How we performed

Our wastewater network is of a high quality and satisfaction with the service is very high. Although resident perceptions of value for money have declined, only 5% disagree that the service provides value for money. Our sewerage network is fully compliant with its resource consent but we have had some issues with contamination of freshwater, which we need to address.

We measure the standard of the wastewater service

Customer (%) satisfaction with wastewater services

Response time to service requests (%) within one hour of notification

Result: 95% of requests were responded to within one hour of notification (target: 95%; 2012/13: 67%).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Residents (%) who agree wastewater services provide good value for money

Result: 73% (target: 75%; 2012/13: 79%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

We measure the impact of wastewater on the environment

Freshwater sites (%) within acceptable faecal coliform counts

Decreasing water quality is due to pollutants running off roads and wastewater infiltration into the stormwater network. We have completed work to detect and repair infiltration issues in Miramar and work is underway in Island Bay. Investigations are continuing in Ngauranga, Karori and Kaiwharawhara to identify pollution sources and to improve water quality. To date, no pollution sources have been identified.

Sewage network – resource consent compliance

Result: 100% compliance (target: 100% compliance; 2012/13: 100%; 2011/12: 100%).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

 

2.5
Stormwater
Wai-ua
Top

The stormwater network keeps people and property safe from flooding.

 

What we do

The stormwater network is managed by Capacity Infrastructure Services.

What we achieved

We upgraded the stormwater network. Stormwater drains were upgraded at five locations throughout the city. The Davis Street culvert was strengthened as it is on the Wellington oversize vehicles route. Work began on stage 2 of the Tasman Street stormwater upgrade project tunnelling under the Massey University campus.

We submitted the integrated catchment management plan (stage 1) to Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) in accordance with the conditions of the resource consent for stormwater discharge to the Coastal Marine Area.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.5.1  Stormwater management1
Expenditure 17,503 18,138 635 17,490
Revenue (1,852) (49) 1,803 (3,655)
Net Expenditure 15,651 18,089 2,438 13,835
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.5.1  Stormwater management2
Expenditure 4,193 5,220 1,027 2,564
Unspent portion
of budget to be
​carried forward
n/a -   n/a
  1. Under budget due to assets, which have been vested to Council. The value of these assets is reflected as income. Also insurance and interest expenditure was lower than budgeted.
  2. Under budget due to delays in several projects in the stormwater renewal programme, including Tasman Street, Main Road Tawa and Kent Terrace, where work will continue in 2014/15.

How we performed

Overall performance is at a high level. Negative impacts from the network were localised and typically caused by cross-contamination as a result of storms.

We measure the standard of the stormwater service

Residents (%) who agree stormwater services provide good value for money

Result: 69% (target: 75%; 2012/13: 69%).

Source: Residents Monitoring Survey 2014

Customer (%) satisfaction with stormwater network service

Response time to service requests (%) within one hour of notification

Result: 98% (target: 95%; 2012/13: 77%).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Number of buildings reported to have been flooded as a result of a less than 1-in-50-year rain event

Result: 5 properties flooded (target: 0; 2012/13: 49).

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

Flooding occurred in September and November 2013. Three of the flooding incidents were as a result of blocked sumps.

We understand the impact of stormwater on the environment

Bathing beaches (%) compliance with Ministry for the Environment guidelines (Green Status)

Seawater samples are collected and analysed for Enterococci bacteria, in accordance with GWRC and the Ministry for the Environment requirements. Samples collected within 48 hours of a heavy rain event can read high due to contaminants entering the stormwater network. This year, no beaches were closed for swimming during the summer. We are now starting stage two of a project developing management plans for Wellington catchments.

Stormwater resource consent compliance (includes the monitoring of overflows, stormwater outfall discharge and coastal water quality)

Stormwater resource consent compliance has been achieved.

Source: Capacity Infrastructure Services Ltd

 

 

2.6
Conservation attractions
Ngā painga kukume Papa Atawha
Top

Nature is one of Wellington’s biggest attractions.

 

What we do

We support the Wellington Zoo and Zealandia. These facilities play important conservation roles, protecting native and exotic flora and fauna. They inform and educate, attract visitors, and their existence creates economic incentives for the city’s environment to be protected and enhanced. Our activities include:

  • Wellington Zoo
  • ​Zealandia
(see also botanic gardens)

What we achieved

Wellington Zoo opened new attractions and treated native animals. Our walk-through Australian precinct, Neighbours, was officially opened at the end of September by Mayor Celia Wade-Brown and Australian High Commissioner Michael Potts. Nearly 500 native animals were treated at The Nest Te Kōhanga. They were brought in from the SPCA, the Department of Conservation (DOC), Zealandia and local members of the community. This shows the growing recognition of The Nest Te Kōhanga as a centre for native wildlife care.

We supported Zealandia and secured its future. This year, admission revenue was 8% above budget, paid visitor numbers increased by 19%, total membership numbers increased by 10% and the number of new members increase by 40%. Zealandia’s international reputation is growing. We had visitors from Canada, Korea, Australia, United Kingdom and the United States who work in the urban environment space, and see Zealandia as a world-leading working model.

Our conservation attractions won awards. The Zoo’s reptile and invertebrate house Hero HQ won the best Small Exhibit from a Large Organisation Award at the Zoo Aquarium Association Conference this year. The Zoo also won the Sustainable 60 Marketplace Award for excellence in sustainable initiatives. Zealandia has been voted Best Local Operator 2014 by the Viator Travel Awards, in recognition of a year of 5-star customer ratings.

What it cost

Operating
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.6.1  Conservation visitor attractions
Expenditure 5,962 5,779 (183) 5,354
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 5,962 5,779 (183) 5,354
Capital
expenditure
​($000)
Actual
2014
 
Budget
2014
 
Variance
2014
 
Actual
2013
 
2.6.1  Conservation visitor attractions1
Expenditure 1,203 1,203 - 2,144
Unspent portion
of budget to be
​carried forward
n/a 1,866 - n/a
  1. Under budget due to delays in the ‘Meet the Locals’ project at the Zoo.

How we performed

We were above target for visitor attendance with a substantial visitor increase at Zealandia. We didn’t achieve our target for education programme attendees, although we had a significant improvement from last year.

We measure the success of our investments in promoting the city

Zoo Visitors

Zealandia visitors

Zealandia – education programme attendees

Result: 8,048 (target: 8,445; 2012/13: 7,645; 2011/12: 6,556; 2010/11: 7,068).

Source: Zealandia

1We include this measure in this activity because street cleaning affects water quality in the harbour and city waterways.